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Move More

The Move More Solution

The Move More Solution

The STEM 1.0 Airline Program Home Page

Key Points:

1. When you put your body through stress, such as exercise, it adapts and becomes stronger, faster, more efficient, more resilient, and healthier. 

2. Push yourself to be 1% better each day: add in one more walk per week, get outside once per week, add in 15 minutes of stretching each day. 

If you have 15 minutes to spare, check out this talk I did on how we can live to be 120

We’ve spent the last month focused on moving more. At the heart of my message lies a basic fact: our bodies are adaptation machines. Whenever our muscles are exposed to a level of effort or exertion just beyond their current limits, they register it as stress. They then respond by building new tissues that will be more capable of handling that particular stress next time.

We adapt and get stronger when we push past our current limits. But what does pushing yourself look like when you are not an elite athlete?

From my perspective, pushing yourself is simply about doing a bit more than you are doing already. Number one on the list is exercising regularly. If all you do is increase the number of walks you take from two to four each week, you are extending your limits and improving your health. So run a bit longer, add a bit of weight, add in some intervals, stretch a little more. Do whatever is right for you to push yourself a bit more.

If you do push yourself and develop a consistent routine, you will eventually achieve a state of fitness that is reasonably easy to maintain. You can then choose when and if you want to push to a new level.

That’s a great life, right? Knowing that you can achieve the next level, that you can do more, that you can reach your potential. And then getting out there and doing it.

Make some 1% changes in your food, sleep and movement. You really can do it all – when you focus on small improvements. You get to bed 15 minutes earlier. You swap that bagel for an apple. You take another walk in the park.

There's no doubt that your line of work can make things a bit harder. Each of you has a different work schedule and routine (or a changing routine), and you may have to get a bit creative - or plan a bit ahead - to make your 1% changes. But you can do it.

Exercise will help you achieve your dreams, whatever they are. And if you think you can’t fit it into your life, you’re lying to yourself. You’re putting up resistance for reasons only you can know. Forget about listing all the obstacles to moving more and focus instead on achieving your own version of greatness.

Today's POWER-UP: Add 1% more activity to your day

Ultimately, we all need to build exercise into our lives. But it’s tough. Even though the benefits are so well established, it is still hard to get up off the couch and go for a walk, jog or run. And it can be hard to fit something in midday or mid-shift.

If you do short bouts of activity throughout your day, you can sprinkle exercise into your routine and supercharge your health and performance. Remember, it’s all about being 1% better and learning from the extremes of human health and performance.

Dive Deeper

Here's a short video on how exercise keeps you young!

 

The information and advice provided in this program is intended to assist Sky Regional employees with improving their general health. It is not intended and should not be used in place of advice from your own physician or for treatment or diagnosis of any specific health issue. Sky Regional is not responsible for the content of this program which has been specially developed and is being provided to you by the Wells Group Inc., in consultation with Sky Regional. By participating in this program you acknowledge that undertaking any new health, diet and/or exercise regime involves certain inherent risks, that you assume such risks, and that you release Sky Regional and the Wells Group Inc. from any responsibility or claim relating to such participation. 

The Power of Nature

The Power of Nature

The STEM 1.0 Airline Program Home Page

Key Points:

1. If motivation is a concern, you're more likely to stick to your exercise routine if you exercise outside.

2. Exercising in nature has been shown to improve measures of revitalization, self-esteem, energy, pleasure, and decreases frustration, worry, confusion, depression, tension, and tiredness more than exercising indoors.

3. Exercising in nature also boosts your immune system due to the chemicals emitted by plants. 

Check out the talk I did at the Titan Summit on the power of nature. It's 13 minutes long so watch it whenever you have the chance. 

If you are increasing the time you spend exercising, that’s great! More physical activity will help your muscles, blood, heart and lungs - pretty much everything in your body. Doing it outside is even better. I find that getting outside to exercise is so much better than going to the gym. I go to the gym and I like it, but I really love running on trails. You may not be into running, but getting outside can be more inspiring than being in a gym.

One of the challenges that we are faced with is staying motivated to exercise. About half of people who join a gym don’t stick with it beyond the first year. But people who exercise outside tend to stick with their exercise programs more consistently. So if you’re having trouble being consistent, consider adding an outdoor workout to your routine.

What’s amazing is that simply looking at pictures of nature can lower your blood pressure, stress and mental fatigue. That’s how powerful nature can be. So if you’re reading this at the office change your desktop to a nature scene! Perhaps find another for your phone. Tip: research has shown that images containing water are more restorative than those without.

Another surprising benefit of getting outside is that exposure to plants can improve your immune system. Your immune system helps to fight off illnesses and keeps you healthy. Scientists think that airborne chemicals that plants emit to protect themselves from fungus, bacteria and insects may also benefit humans. In a study published in 2007, people who took 2-hour walks in a forest had a 50% increase in the levels of their natural killer cells. They sound scary but they’re your cells that circulate through your body and kill bacteria, viruses, fungus and other invaders. The benefits of exercising outdoors appear to last for at least a week - maybe even up to a month! So once per week (or at least once per month) spend some time outside doing something fun like hiking on a trail, skiing, or paddle boarding. The more you can immerse yourself in nature, the better.
 
It also turns out that if you prefer light activity to running or more intense activities you’re in luck. It appears that walking in nature improves measures of revitalization, self-esteem, energy, pleasure, and decreases frustration, worry, confusion, depression, tension, and tiredness far more than light activity indoors does. So if you want to feel better, get outside and don’t worry about whether or not you walk or run.

I think these studies are really interesting because we often think of exercise as only being good for our bodies. It turns out that exercise can be just as good for our brains and our minds, and that exercising in nature might amplify the benefits.

Today's POWER-UP: Get outside!

1. Exercise outside at least once per week.

2. If you have a hectic work schedule, plan ahead to schedule a time to get outside between shifts. Whether you are at home or away, search for local parks and spend some time strolling in nature.

Dive Deeper

Check out this National Geographic article on the effects of nature on your brain.

 

The information and advice provided in this program is intended to assist Sky Regional employees with improving their general health. It is not intended and should not be used in place of advice from your own physician or for treatment or diagnosis of any specific health issue. Sky Regional is not responsible for the content of this program which has been specially developed and is being provided to you by the Wells Group Inc., in consultation with Sky Regional. By participating in this program you acknowledge that undertaking any new health, diet and/or exercise regime involves certain inherent risks, that you assume such risks, and that you release Sky Regional and the Wells Group Inc. from any responsibility or claim relating to such participation. 

Recover and Regenerate

Recover and Regenerate

The STEM 1.0 Airline Program Home Page

Key Points:

1. Your body will adapt faster, you will have fewer injuries, and you'll be healthier if you follow the 4 key steps of recovery and regeneration:

2. Active Recovery: 5-15 minutes of low-moderate activity at the end of your workout helps clear out the waste products that have accumulated in your body during exercise.

3. Rehydrate: Make sure you're rehydrating with water following your workout. If you're exercising in hot, humid conditions, you can add some carbohydrates and electrolytes to your drink.

4. Refuel: Refuel with healthy carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. If you've completed an aerobic workout, have a meal with a 4:1 carbohydrate to protein ratio. Following a strength workout, the ratio should be closer to 2:1.

5. Regenerate: Give your body time to breakdown and then repair after a workout. A simple guide to follow is 8-12 hours for light workouts, 48 hours for strength or interval workouts, 24-48 hours for long cardio sessions, and 48-72 hours for sprint training.  

Want to know one of the greatest secrets to being stronger, swifter and fitter? Hint: it’s not about lifting more, running faster, or adding extra workouts!

Let’s assume that you want to step up your activity from where you currently are. And you’d like a little boost in taking that step. You want to be 1% better, and you’re looking for some tips. One way to becoming fitter is to apply the science of recovery and regeneration.

The healing and repair process is as important, if not more important, than the actual exercise or training. To raise your endurance, increase your muscle mass, develop stronger bones and even build a better brain, you need time to rest and recover. Your body will adapt faster, you’ll have fewer injuries and you’ll be healthier.

Here are my steps to getting the most out of your workouts – after your workouts.

Step 1: Active Recovery

Warm down slowly and properly to clear your body of waste products that accumulate when you exercise. Help your muscles out by taking 5-15 minutes of active recovery: moving your body at about 50-60% of your maximum heart rate rather than stopping completely after exercise. You shouldn’t feel a burn, but you should be moving more than you do when not working out. You could cycle, walk fast or run slowly. Note: An easy way to calculate your maximum heart rate is to subtract your age from 220. This means if you're 40 years old, your maximum heart rate is approximately 180 beats per minute.  

Step 2: Rehydrate

Rehydrate with water. If you’ve been working out for longer than 90 minutes or in hot, humid conditions, you can add some carbohydrates and electrolytes to your drink. But most of all, focus on water. You need a lot of it to properly heal and grow.

Step 3: Refuel

It’s time to get nutrients back into your system. I believe that post-workout nutrition should improve your overall health, hence my objection to chocolate milk. Stick to any of the healthy foods we have already discussed: complex carbohydrates and high-quality proteins and fats. If your workout is more aerobic, try a 4:1 ratio of carbohydrate to protein. If you’re doing strength training or higher-intensity intervals, eat closer to a 2:1 ratio of carbohydrate to protein.

Step 4: Regenerate

This is where we need to geek-out a bit and talk about physiology. That’s because if you understand inflammation and its role in helping the body to repair after exercise, you’ll know how to regenerate. So here’s the science.

When muscle fibres are damaged, inflammatory cells move to the area and help break down and remove damaged tissue. Our bodies also produce a powerful hormone called insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). This hormone instructs satellite cells to repair damaged muscle fibres and begin producing new ones. This whole inflammatory process can take up to 72 hours to complete after an intense workout, which is why mixing hard and easy days gives your body the time it needs for the inflammatory response to work its magic.

Here are some basic regeneration times to hold in mind: for light workouts, 8-12 hours is enough. Strength or interval workouts that make you sore normally require about 48 hours. Long cardio sessions that drain your glycogen stores require about 24-48 hours. Pure speed and sprint training sessions take 48-72 hours to recover from.

Inflammation after exercise is a critical healing process. Your body needs the process of breaking down, experiencing inflammation, and making the repairs in order to develop and improve!

Today's POWER-UP: Practice the 4 Steps

1. Finish your workouts with 5-15 minutes of light cardio.

2. Then have a drink of clear, cold water.

3. Follow that with a healthy snack.

4. And finally - get some sleep!

You'll feel better and your health and energy will improve exponentially!

 

The information and advice provided in this program is intended to assist Sky Regional employees with improving their general health. It is not intended and should not be used in place of advice from your own physician or for treatment or diagnosis of any specific health issue. Sky Regional is not responsible for the content of this program which has been specially developed and is being provided to you by the Wells Group Inc., in consultation with Sky Regional. By participating in this program you acknowledge that undertaking any new health, diet and/or exercise regime involves certain inherent risks, that you assume such risks, and that you release Sky Regional and the Wells Group Inc. from any responsibility or claim relating to such participation. 

Build Your Strength

Build Your Strength

The STEM 1.0 Airline Program Home Page

Key Points:

1. Strength training works your type 2 muscle fibres, which are used for activities that require strength and speed. 

2. Strength training doesn't just make your stronger. It also helps to prevent various chronic illnesses and diseases such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, depression, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease.

3. If you've never done strength training before, you should get some advice from a Registered Kinesiologist or certified strength and conditioning specialist to learn the proper techniques.

When you do strength training you are engaging different energy systems and muscle fibres than when you’re doing aerobic training. This type of exercise is more intense and requires that you create more force with your muscles than what you need to do when you’re doing light to moderate intensity aerobic activity. Just think of the difference between hiking in the woods vs. carrying heavy bags of groceries. One requires a little bit of energy over a long time (hiking) and the other requires a lot of force over a short period of time (carrying). Both are critical for health and performance.

You have 2 main kinds of muscle fibres: type 1 which are fibres that you use to do light aerobic activity and type 2 fibres that you use for activities that require strength and speed. By engaging your type 2 muscle fibres, you are working the full spectrum of your fibres. This develops your total muscle strength and prepares your body for situations when you have to pick up the pace – like the final kick when the finish line comes into sight, or sprinting for a plane!

Muscle growth occurs when micro-tears in the fibres work in conjunction with a molecule called mTOR that is produced during a strength session to stimulate the production of new protein chains. In essence, you break your muscles down to build them up!

However, mTOR doesn’t just stimulate your muscles to get stronger. It does some amazing things as it circulates throughout your body during and after a strength session. New research shows that mTOR can help prevent cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, depression, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease, among others. This mean that strength training is as important for our health as cardiovascular activities.

Strength training is also great if you want to improve your body composition and lose fat. Muscle tissue burns fat more easily. If you can increase your muscle mass, you will have more metabolically active tissue that will burn fat as fuel, even at rest. Remember that when you are strength training, you may gain some weight even though you are losing fat. Your focus needs to be on body composition, not the number on the scale. So keep in mind that this kind of weight gain is healthy for you.

Worried that you are going to get big and bulky if you lift weights? Don’t be. The reality is that unless you make a decision to get into bodybuilding, you will find that lifting weights for strength simply improves your body composition, helps you feel better and slows the aging process—all without developing big, bulky muscles.

It is critical to maintain proper form when you’re doing strength training. Get some help to learn the right exercises for you and how to build a training program. See a Registered Kinesiologist, or certified strength and conditioning specialist. A good standard to look for is someone with a degree in kinesiology who is also a certified strength and conditioning specialist (CSCS).

Today's POWER-UP: Adam's Hotel Workout

If you don't like going to the gym or if you'd just like a quick workout after a flight, check out Adam's Hotel Workout.

 

The information and advice provided in this program is intended to assist Sky Regional employees with improving their general health. It is not intended and should not be used in place of advice from your own physician or for treatment or diagnosis of any specific health issue. Sky Regional is not responsible for the content of this program which has been specially developed and is being provided to you by the Wells Group Inc., in consultation with Sky Regional. By participating in this program you acknowledge that undertaking any new health, diet and/or exercise regime involves certain inherent risks, that you assume such risks, and that you release Sky Regional and the Wells Group Inc. from any responsibility or claim relating to such participation. 

Build Your Flexibility

Build Your Flexibility

The STEM 1.0 Airline Program Home Page

Key Points:

1. Regular stretching decreases muscle tension, reduces pain, improves range of motion, relaxes muscles and nerves, and decreases stress.

2. There are two main types of stretches - Dynamic and Static - which have opposite effects on the body. 

3. Dynamic stretching (anything that stretches your muscle while moving) should be done before exercise as it increases blood flow, muscle temperature, and range of motion.

4. Static stretching (holding your muscle in a stretch for a period of time) should be done after exercise as it helps to align muscles and reduce tension.

Stretching (also known as building flexibility and mobility) is an incredibly important element of overall fitness that is often overlooked. Yes, there is an ongoing debate about exactly what kind of stretching is best, but there is no debate about the fact that everyone should do it. Regular stretching decreases muscle tension, reduces pain, and improves range of motion. In an era when activities like sitting decrease our flexibility, stretching matters a lot.

The most important message about stretching is to create a consistent routine. Whether you attend yoga, stretch while hanging out with your kids or stretch before or after a workout, try to aim for 15 minutes or more per day.

But what kind of stretches should you do?

There are two major categories of stretches: static and dynamic. Static is the name for traditional stretches in which you stretch a muscle and hold it for a period of time. Dynamic stretching is the name for any motion that extends your muscles while moving, like swinging your legs or arms, or doing lunges before a workout. Each type of stretching has an opposite effect on the nervous system. 

Before you exercise, dynamic stretching is the preferred approach. Dynamic stretching causes excitatory neuromuscular signals to be sent from your brain to your muscles and increases range of motion, blood flow and muscle temperature, all of which help with exercise.

Static stretching is best done when you are cooling down or when you're just stretching to relax. It helps to align your muscle fibres and reduces tension. So do this type of stretching after exercise, after a shift to relax your muscles and nerves, or to de-stress.

If you are new to static or dynamic stretching, make sure you get some expert advice about how to proceed so that you have good form and understand the basic guidelines. For example, you should never bounce during a static stretch and should hold each stretch for 20-30 seconds. Also, make sure you warm up prior to dynamic stretching. See the cardio warm-up for examples of dynamic stretches you can do before an aerobic workout, and the weights warm-up for examples of exercises and stretches to do before a weights workout. Try this stretching routine for static stretches you should do post-workout or after a flight to recover faster.

Today's POWER-UP: Incorporate stretching into your daily routine

1. Stretching doesn't have to be before and after a workout. Try the cardio warm-up and weights warm-up midday to get your blood flowing or when you arrive at a hotel.

2. Try this stretching routine to calm your body down before you go to sleep.

 

The information and advice provided in this program is intended to assist Sky Regional employees with improving their general health. It is not intended and should not be used in place of advice from your own physician or for treatment or diagnosis of any specific health issue. Sky Regional is not responsible for the content of this program which has been specially developed and is being provided to you by the Wells Group Inc., in consultation with Sky Regional. By participating in this program you acknowledge that undertaking any new health, diet and/or exercise regime involves certain inherent risks, that you assume such risks, and that you release Sky Regional and the Wells Group Inc. from any responsibility or claim relating to such participation. 

Build Your Fitness

Build Your Fitness

The STEM 1.0 Airline Program Home Page

Key points:

1. The aerobic system fuels most of the activities we do every day - walking, playing a musical instrument, solving a problem.

2. Regular aerobic exercise such as swimming, jogging, cycling, or hiking, makes your cardiovascular system stronger (heart, blood vessels, lungs) and energy pathways in your muscles more efficient. 

3. Training your aerobic system is the foundation of health and performance.

The potential for improvement in our lives by moving more is great. Simply standing up changes that way your body uses energy, circulates blood, and also how you think! Exercise can improve concentration, learning, focus, memory, and can even prevent and treat mental illnesses. But taking advantage of this will require a paradigm shift. We need to incorporate movement into our daily lives. Here a key to making that happen - build your fitness.

The foundation of health and performance is your aerobic system. The aerobic system is the system that uses oxygen to create energy that fuels most of the activities in your life, from walking to running, to playing music, to writing a test, or to solving a math problem. Low to moderate physical activity is the key to building up your aerobic system and unlocking all the related benefits.

Walking, jogging, cycling, swimming, hiking and other low to moderate level activities will build up your cardiovascular system (heart, lungs, blood, blood vessels) and the aerobic energy pathway inside your muscles. When you put stress on your muscles, heart and lungs by pushing them through these activities, you stimulate adaptation in the system and make it more efficient.

To begin with, forcing your heart to beat more frequently causes the same change in your heart that occur in any muscle you use regularly – it gets stronger and can pump blood through the body more easily. The amount of blood that moves through your body with each beat of your heart is called “stroke volume” and if you exercise regularly, you increase the amount of blood that can be pumped by your heart each time it beats.

You are also increasing the rate at which oxygen is absorbed into your body by your tissues. This happens because you induce a process called “angiogenesis” which increases the density of the capillary beds that surround your muscle fibres. Capillaries are the tiny vessels at the end of the chain of blood vessels that begins with your heart and arteries. There are between 3 and 5 capillaries around each muscle fibre in your body and endurance activity ensures that your capillary beds will be at the upper end of that range.

Aerobic exercise also encourages the growth and development of mitochondria. Mitochondria are little organelles inside your cells that produce energy. Exercise stimulates mitochondria to grow, replicate and improve their ability to make use of carbohydrates, proteins and fats in order to generate energy. This does take some time, so be patient when you start a workout routine – the energy boost might take a few weeks to come online as your body produces enough mitochondria to meet the new demand!

Today's POWER-UP: Find an aerobic activity you enjoy

1. There are many aerobic activities that you can do depending on the season and what's available to you: walking, jogging, cycling, paddle boarding, playing in the park with your kids, cross country skiing, swimming, etc...

2. Brainstorm what activity or activities you enjoy doing so that you'll stick to it! 

Dive Deeper: What type of exercise is best for your brain?

There are three main types of exercise. Aerobic exercise like running, high intensity interval training like spinning, and resistance training like lifting weights.

While looking at the impact of these different types of exercise on the brains of humans is extremely difficult and expensive, researchers in Finland looked at the impact of exercise on the brains of rats. They found that 6-8 weeks of aerobic exercise led to the growth of new neurons in the hippocampus (a part of the brain associated with learning and memory).

High intensity training had a small, non-significant impact on the brain and resistance training did not change neural structures in the hippocampus.

So what does that mean for you? If you want to optimize your brain and keep it healthy you should walk, jog, swim, or hike regularly!

 

The information and advice provided in this program is intended to assist Sky Regional employees with improving their general health. It is not intended and should not be used in place of advice from your own physician or for treatment or diagnosis of any specific health issue. Sky Regional is not responsible for the content of this program which has been specially developed and is being provided to you by the Wells Group Inc., in consultation with Sky Regional. By participating in this program you acknowledge that undertaking any new health, diet and/or exercise regime involves certain inherent risks, that you assume such risks, and that you release Sky Regional and the Wells Group Inc. from any responsibility or claim relating to such participation. 

Move More to Build Your Health

Move More to Build Your Health

The STEM 1.0 Airline Program Home Page

Key Points:

1. Physical activity strengthens your immune system to help fight off bacteria, viruses and other pathogens - regular consistent exercise reduces your chances of getting sick.

2. Less is more: A moderate amount of exercise (5-6 hours per week) reduces your risk of illnesses and infections, while a high volume and intensity of exercise can compromise your immune system. 

3. Close social bonds also decreases your risk of illness, so exercising with a friend or family member gives you a double boost of immunity!

“Those who do not find time for exercise will have to find time for illness.” -Edward Stanley

In my first Move More message, I indicated that sitting is a challenge. Today’s message – which is one of my mantras – is that a little change goes a long way. That’s why I always focus on being 1% better. You can easily do things 1% better. And a series of 1% changes pay off big time.

Here’s what else is great about moving more: you strengthen your immune system, which works to fight off viruses, bacteria and other pathogens. It’s like chemical and biological warfare inside the body. When the system works well, we fight off invaders and stay healthy. When the system is ineffective, we get sick.

You probably won’t be surprised to hear that people who exercise regularly experience fewer illnesses and infections than those who do not. In fact, people who exercise daily experience 75% fewer colds and flus!

But here’s a finding that might surprise you: exercising beyond a moderate level does not improve immunity further. Quite the opposite, in fact. When athletes train at a higher intensity than normal for extended periods, they experience a significant increase in illnesses. The immune system is compromised and it's easier to get sick.

If you are a moderate exerciser, you may have noticed that you take fewer sick days than your coworkers. Or you might be the only one of your group of friends who doesn’t catch the cold going around. This isn’t just your imagination. Numerous studies have demonstrated that regular, moderate exercise improves how well your immune system works.

And here’s a fun fact: research from Carnegie Mellon University reported that people with good social bonds (close relationships with friends and family) are less susceptible than others to the common cold. So exercising with friends offers a double boost of health!

So build in some exercise to your routine every day. If you're thinking that you don't have time, remember that by taking a little time up front, you'll be avoiding days and days of illness down the road. If you think that you don't have time to exercise, the reality is that you can't afford not to. Here's a short 3 min video I did for TSN on how running helps keep you healthy. Check it out!

Today's POWER-UP: Build exercise into your daily routine

1. Increase your activity levels to a moderate amount, aiming for about five or six hours each week. Any exercise counts - walk, lift, yoga, swim, etc...

2. Exercise with a friend of family member when you can to boost your immune system even more!

Dive Deeper: What's the best time of day to exercise?

If there is one question that I get more often than any other it’s what is the best time of day to train? The answer is that the best time of day to train, is the time of day when you can train consistently.

If that is first thing in the morning, then that’s great. If it's between shifts or during a layover, fantastic. if it's in the evening - as long as it's not too close to bed - brilliant.

If you work out first thing in the morning you are increasing your metabolism and that will help you all day long. Not to mention you are flooding your brain with all sorts of chemicals and hormones that will help you to think better.

Midday can also be terrific as it will give you a surge of energy that can help you avoid the afternoon blahs. My colleague Robin Sharma, author of The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari, calls this “the second wind workout”.

Afternoon and evening workouts take advantage of the natural increases in strength and endurance that happen with changes in our circadian rhythms and can help to break down all the stress hormones that you’ve built up during the day.

There are benefits to each time of day. So the message is to do what works best for you and what you can do consistently.

 

The information and advice provided in this program is intended to assist Sky Regional employees with improving their general health. It is not intended and should not be used in place of advice from your own physician or for treatment or diagnosis of any specific health issue. Sky Regional is not responsible for the content of this program which has been specially developed and is being provided to you by the Wells Group Inc., in consultation with Sky Regional. By participating in this program you acknowledge that undertaking any new health, diet and/or exercise regime involves certain inherent risks, that you assume such risks, and that you release Sky Regional and the Wells Group Inc. from any responsibility or claim relating to such participation. 

Welcome to Move More!

Welcome to Move More!

The STEM 1.0 Airline Program Home Page

Key points:

1. We’re in the midst of the Inactivity Epidemic: The average adult spends 9-10 hours sitting each day.

2. The more you sit, the more likely you are to developing chronic illnesses, including obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cancer.

3. The good news: you don’t need to do much physical activity to reduce your risk of getting these illnesses.

4. 1% changes - such as 15 minutes of walking each day - reduces your risk of getting breast and colon cancer by 24-50%.

“If we could give every individual the right amount of nourishment and exercise - not too little and not too much - we would have found the safest way to health.” – Hippocrates

A new drug has been discovered with such broad ranging powers that it may end up being the cure for all human disease. Early reports suggest that it can be used to prevent and treat almost every chronic disease faced by humans. The list of benefits of taking this drug are truly amazing:

This drug has been shown to:

·      lower your risk of certain types of cancer by 24-50%,

·      prevent and treat cardiovascular disease,

·      reverse type 2 diabetes,

·      reduce the number of cold and flu infections that you get by 75%,

·      prevent osteoporosis,

·      alleviate depression and anxiety,

·      prevent Alzheimer’s disease,

·      improve memory, learning, problem solving and concentration,

·      make you happier.

There is only one catch to this drug. You have to take it almost every day for the rest of your life. You have to be consistent. If you do that you’re guaranteed to get the benefits. Have you figured it out yet? Most likely yes, given the theme of this unit! This “drug” is exercise. It does all of the above and much, much, more. Are you in?

I hope so. But keep in mind that you are faced with a grand challenge – the inactivity epidemic.

As with the challenges we face with when it comes to eating well, it’s not easy to build exercise into our day. And many of our daily tasks are killing us. We commute to and from work using cars or public transportation. Most people - perhaps you or perhaps not, depending on your assignment - have sitting jobs. Pilots have to sit while flying.

The British Medical Journal reports that the average adult spends between 9-10 hours sitting each day. That’s a lot of sedentary behaviour! And it happens because our world is built to sit us down. Which means that our world is also built to make us sick.

We now know that sitting is an independent risk factor for chronic illnesses. Basically, the more sedentary you are, the sicker you will probably get. Consider that a recent review of 43 studies found that people who reported sitting for more hours of the day had a 24% greater risk of developing colon cancer, a 32% higher risk of endometrial cancer and a 21% higher risk of lung cancer.

But what can all of us do to improve our health and wellness? 

We need to move more – and move more consistently. Whether you have some or almost no movement in your workday currently, you need move daily to build your best life.

Short bouts of activity throughout your day can supercharge your health and performance. Fifteen minutes of exercise – like a short walk – can increase your ability to concentrate and problem solve. Fifteen minutes of walking each day reduces your risk of breast and colon cancer by 24-50%. The good news is you're probably already getting this by walking to and from the plane at the airport.

Remember, it’s all about being 1% better and learning about human health and performance. Fortunately, the idea that exercise is medicine is exploding around the world. Researchers and clinicians are now discovering powerful links between movement and health.

We’re going to spend some time together exploring these links. If you didn't already fill out the health, wellbeing, and performance audit at the beginning of the program, please take five minutes to fill out this physical activity questionnaire. We can then give you specific recommendations on how to improve your daily physical activity habits. When it asks about a typical weekday, fill in what you do on a typical workday. When it asks about a typical weekend, fill in what you do on a typical day off. 

Today's POWER-UP: Sprinkle movement into your day 

1. Follow the 20/20 rule: For every 20 minutes of sitting, stand and stretch (or just stretch) for 20 seconds. If standing isn't an option like when you're flying, TRY THIS ULTIMATE DESKERCISE ROUTINE OR THESE 8 DESK STRETCHES FROM THE MAYO CLINIC

2. If you take public transportation to work, stand up instead of sitting down.

 

The information and advice provided in this program is intended to assist Sky Regional employees with improving their general health. It is not intended and should not be used in place of advice from your own physician or for treatment or diagnosis of any specific health issue. Sky Regional is not responsible for the content of this program which has been specially developed and is being provided to you by the Wells Group Inc., in consultation with Sky Regional. By participating in this program you acknowledge that undertaking any new health, diet and/or exercise regime involves certain inherent risks, that you assume such risks, and that you release Sky Regional and the Wells Group Inc. from any responsibility or claim relating to such participation.